1. 20:13 1st Aug 2014

    Notes: 104

    Reblogged from dynamicoceans

    Tags: whale sharks

    dynamicoceans:

Whale sharks can live up to 70 years, are the largest fish, and only eat plankton!
And they give live birth!

….and they are not aggressive in the way sharks usually are!

    dynamicoceans:

    Whale sharks can live up to 70 years, are the largest fish, and only eat plankton!

    And they give live birth!

    ….and they are not aggressive in the way sharks usually are!

     
  2.  
  3. image: Download

    newsweek:

The 20-Year-Old Ebola Treatment That Could Save Kent Brantly
The devastation wrought by the worst recorded Ebola outbreak in history grows daily. As of Thursday, the deaths totalled 729 deaths in West Africa, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), but it’s far from over; ”Ebola is worsening in West Africa,” CDC director Tom Frieden said not once, or twice, but three times on Thursday.
Infectious disease experts are mobilizing, borders are shutting down, and, despite the fact that there is no cure for Ebola haemorrhagic fever (the illness caused by Ebola virus infection), health care officials are trying anything they can to help the stricken—especially those who put themselves at risk to save others. That means digging deep into the list of experimental methods the WHO, CDC and others have developed over the past few years to cure the deadly viral infection—including a simple but controversial therapy called immune plasma infusion.
In Monrovia, Liberia, 33-year old Dr. Kent Brantly of Forth Worth, Texas had been treating Ebola patients since June, as part of an international relief group called Samaritan’s Purse. But in mid-July, Brantly recognized that he himself was showing symptoms of Ebola. He isolated himself, and told the rest of the team of his suspicions; soon after, his diagnosis was confirmed.
On Thursday Brantly was given a shot at survival: a 14-year-old male Ebola patient who had been under Brantly’s care, and survived, donated a “unit of blood” to Brantly, according to Samaritan’s Purse President Franklin Graham. “The young boy and his family wanted to be able to help the doctor that saved his life.”

The idea—novel, though not unprecedented—is that the blood (plasma, in medical parlance) of a survivor, full of antibodies proven to be strong enough to fight off the disease (i.e., immune), when transfused into an infected body, might help that body become immune itself. Though it sounds a bit like something Hollywood might have cooked up, there’s some science behind it—and an historical precedent that offers hope.The devastation wrought by the worst recorded Ebola outbreak in history grows daily. As of Thursday, the deaths totalled 729 deaths in West Africa, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), but it’s far from over; ”Ebola is worsening in West Africa,” CDC director Tom Frieden said not once, or twice, but three times on Thursday.
Infectious disease experts are mobilizing, borders are shutting down, and, despite the fact that there is no cure for Ebola haemorrhagic fever (the illness caused by Ebola virus infection), health care officials are trying anything they can to help the stricken—especially those who put themselves at risk to save others. That means digging deep into the list of experimental methods the WHO, CDC and others have developed over the past few years to cure the deadly viral infection—including a simple but controversial therapy called immune plasma infusion.
In Monrovia, Liberia, 33-year old Dr. Kent Brantly of Forth Worth, Texas had been treating Ebola patients since June, as part of an international relief group called Samaritan’s Purse. But in mid-July, Brantly recognized that he himself was showing symptoms of Ebola. He isolated himself, and told the rest of the team of his suspicions; soon after, his diagnosis was confirmed.
On Thursday Brantly was given a shot at survival: a 14-year-old male Ebola patient who had been under Brantly’s care, and survived, donated a “unit of blood” to Brantly, according to Samaritan’s Purse President Franklin Graham. “The young boy and his family wanted to be able to help the doctor that saved his life.”
The idea—novel, though not unprecedented—is that the blood (plasma, in medical parlance) of a survivor, full of antibodies proven to be strong enough to fight off the disease (i.e., immune), when transfused into an infected body, might help that body become immune itself. Though it sounds a bit like something Hollywood might have cooked up, there’s some science behind it—and an historical precedent that offers hope.

Click above to read the rest of the story.
 

    newsweek:

    The 20-Year-Old Ebola Treatment That Could Save Kent Brantly

    The devastation wrought by the worst recorded Ebola outbreak in history grows daily. As of Thursday, the deaths totalled 729 deaths in West Africa, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), but it’s far from over; ”Ebola is worsening in West Africa,” CDC director Tom Frieden said not once, or twice, but three times on Thursday.

    Infectious disease experts are mobilizing, borders are shutting down, and, despite the fact that there is no cure for Ebola haemorrhagic fever (the illness caused by Ebola virus infection), health care officials are trying anything they can to help the stricken—especially those who put themselves at risk to save others. That means digging deep into the list of experimental methods the WHO, CDC and others have developed over the past few years to cure the deadly viral infection—including a simple but controversial therapy called immune plasma infusion.

    In Monrovia, Liberia, 33-year old Dr. Kent Brantly of Forth Worth, Texas had been treating Ebola patients since June, as part of an international relief group called Samaritan’s Purse. But in mid-July, Brantly recognized that he himself was showing symptoms of Ebola. He isolated himself, and told the rest of the team of his suspicions; soon after, his diagnosis was confirmed.

    On Thursday Brantly was given a shot at survival: a 14-year-old male Ebola patient who had been under Brantly’s care, and survived, donated a “unit of blood” to Brantly, according to Samaritan’s Purse President Franklin Graham. “The young boy and his family wanted to be able to help the doctor that saved his life.”

    The idea—novel, though not unprecedented—is that the blood (plasma, in medical parlance) of a survivor, full of antibodies proven to be strong enough to fight off the disease (i.e., immune), when transfused into an infected body, might help that body become immune itself. Though it sounds a bit like something Hollywood might have cooked up, there’s some science behind it—and an historical precedent that offers hope.The devastation wrought by the worst recorded Ebola outbreak in history grows daily. As of Thursday, the deaths totalled 729 deaths in West Africa, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), but it’s far from over; ”Ebola is worsening in West Africa,” CDC director Tom Frieden said not once, or twice, but three times on Thursday.

    Infectious disease experts are mobilizing, borders are shutting down, and, despite the fact that there is no cure for Ebola haemorrhagic fever (the illness caused by Ebola virus infection), health care officials are trying anything they can to help the stricken—especially those who put themselves at risk to save others. That means digging deep into the list of experimental methods the WHO, CDC and others have developed over the past few years to cure the deadly viral infection—including a simple but controversial therapy called immune plasma infusion.

    In Monrovia, Liberia, 33-year old Dr. Kent Brantly of Forth Worth, Texas had been treating Ebola patients since June, as part of an international relief group called Samaritan’s Purse. But in mid-July, Brantly recognized that he himself was showing symptoms of Ebola. He isolated himself, and told the rest of the team of his suspicions; soon after, his diagnosis was confirmed.

    On Thursday Brantly was given a shot at survival: a 14-year-old male Ebola patient who had been under Brantly’s care, and survived, donated a “unit of blood” to Brantly, according to Samaritan’s Purse President Franklin Graham. “The young boy and his family wanted to be able to help the doctor that saved his life.”

    The idea—novel, though not unprecedented—is that the blood (plasma, in medical parlance) of a survivor, full of antibodies proven to be strong enough to fight off the disease (i.e., immune), when transfused into an infected body, might help that body become immune itself. Though it sounds a bit like something Hollywood might have cooked up, there’s some science behind it—and an historical precedent that offers hope.

    Click above to read the rest of the story.

     

     
  4. 12:09

    Notes: 4

    Reblogged from one-photo-day

    image: Download

    one-photo-day:

García Márquez by Graciela Iturbide

    one-photo-day:

    García Márquez by Graciela Iturbide

     
  5. 12:06

    Notes: 98

    Reblogged from usagov

    Tags: BLMcalifornia coastal national monument

    usagov:

    Image description:

    From the Bureau of Land Management:

    Surfs Up! 

    Spectacular scenery, abundant wildlife, and heartfelt connections - these are the natural ties between community residents and nature that combine to make the Bureau of Land Management’s California Coastal National Monument unique among the agency’s assemblage of National Conservation Lands.

    Read  Surfs Up! - a feature article about the monument in the Bureau of Land Management’s My Public Lands Magazine, Summer 2014.  

    Dude, let’s go check it out…

     
  6. image: Download

    coolchicksfromhistory:

majarysuje:

70th Anniversary of Warsaw Uprising. We remember.

A little context for those who don’t know….
On August 1, 1944 the poorly armed Polish Home Army rose up against the Nazis and reclaimed Warsaw.  With almost no help from the Allied Powers, they held the city for sixty three days before they were forced to surrender.  After the Nazis recaptured Warsaw, they razed the city and deported the entire civilian population.  Most of the civilian population was released, but a significant minority was deported to the death camps.  
The art above is a reinterpretation of one of the most iconic images of the Warsaw Uprising- Eugeniusza Lokajskiego’s photo of Różyczka Goździewska (d. 1989), a little girl who volunteered at a Warsaw field hospital.  
The Warsaw Uprising is not the same thing as the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising.  The Warsaw Ghetto uprising took place in 1943, not 1944.

The Warsaw Ghetto Uprising had an even more grim history & ending, and thus should not be referred to in passing.  For the full story (WW-II history is NOT a strength of mine), see:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warsaw_Ghetto_Uprising

    coolchicksfromhistory:

    majarysuje:

    70th Anniversary of Warsaw Uprising. We remember.

    A little context for those who don’t know….

    On August 1, 1944 the poorly armed Polish Home Army rose up against the Nazis and reclaimed Warsaw.  With almost no help from the Allied Powers, they held the city for sixty three days before they were forced to surrender.  After the Nazis recaptured Warsaw, they razed the city and deported the entire civilian population.  Most of the civilian population was released, but a significant minority was deported to the death camps.  

    The art above is a reinterpretation of one of the most iconic images of the Warsaw Uprising- Eugeniusza Lokajskiego’s photo of Różyczka Goździewska (d. 1989), a little girl who volunteered at a Warsaw field hospital.  

    The Warsaw Uprising is not the same thing as the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising.  The Warsaw Ghetto uprising took place in 1943, not 1944.

    The Warsaw Ghetto Uprising had an even more grim history & ending, and thus should not be referred to in passing.  For the full story (WW-II history is NOT a strength of mine), see:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Warsaw_Ghetto_Uprising

     
  7. 11:59

    Notes: 34

    Reblogged from thenewrepublic

    Tags: UCLAwatr mainwater conservation

    image: Download

    thenewrepublic:

Can’t visualize the 10 million gallons of water gushing through UCLA? This should help—that’s approximately 3 million toilet flushes.

Just another demonstration of lousy infrastructure.  We had a main burst in Seattle near the very posh University Village.  I have no idea how many gallons were lost; all I know was that the pipe was at least 50 years old.
Get it together, whoever is in charge (which is part of the problem…)

    thenewrepublic:

    Can’t visualize the 10 million gallons of water gushing through UCLA? This should help—that’s approximately 3 million toilet flushes.

    Just another demonstration of lousy infrastructure.  We had a main burst in Seattle near the very posh University Village.  I have no idea how many gallons were lost; all I know was that the pipe was at least 50 years old.

    Get it together, whoever is in charge (which is part of the problem…)

     
  8. 11:55

    Notes: 466

    Reblogged from dynamicoceans

    Tags: manta rays

    dynamicoceans:

Many people assume that the Manta Ray is dangerous due to the fact that the Sting Ray is. However, they don’t have a stinger at all. X

…and you can try to pet them at the Monterey Bay Aquarium (good luck, they’re pretty wily)

    dynamicoceans:

    Many people assume that the Manta Ray is dangerous due to the fact that the Sting Ray is. However, they don’t have a stinger at all. X

    …and you can try to pet them at the Monterey Bay Aquarium (good luck, they’re pretty wily)

     
  9. mymodernmet:

    The Hanging Tent Company has created the roomoon, a sphere-shaped, portable tent that hangs from tree branches.

    I want one!

     
  10. 23:23

    Notes: 463

    Reblogged from mymodernmet

    Tags: InstallationmontrealForesta Lumina

    mymodernmet:

    Montreal-based studio Moment Factory has transformed Quebec’s Parc de la Gorge de Coaticook into Foresta Lumina, an illuminated nocturnal trail through an enchanted forest. After nightfall from now until mid-October, visitors to the park are invited to take a magical stroll through the woods on an immersive, storybook-like adventure.

    Love this.  Way better than the Zoo Lights they have at the Tacoma Zoo for Xmas!

     
  11. image: Download

    mosaicrecords:

Mosaic Armstrong Set to Open Satchmo Summerfest in New Orleans
On the eve of Louis Armstrong’s historical birthday of August 1, Mosaic’s Scott Wenzel and Ricky Riccardi, Armstrong biographer and archivist for the Louis Armstrong House Museum, will kick off the 2014 Satchmo Summerfest in New Orleans. At the sold-out opening reception and keynote dinner on July 31, Scott and Ricky will host a keynote discussion on the making of Mosaic’s box set The Columbia and RCA Victor Live Recordings of Louis Armstrong and the All Stars. Check out this article from the New Orleans Times-Picayune about Ricky, Scott and the Mosaic set at Summerfest.The Mosaic Armstrong set will be on sale at the Satchmo Summerfest all weekend. Can’t make it to New Orleans? Not to worry: listen to highlights and order your set here.
 Follow: Mosaic Records Facebook Tumblr Twitter

Damn, it must be like Amazonia Stadium down in N’Orleans, but I’m sure the Satchmo Festival is well worth the trip!

    mosaicrecords:

    Mosaic Armstrong Set to Open Satchmo Summerfest in New Orleans

    On the eve of Louis Armstrong’s historical birthday of August 1, Mosaic’s Scott Wenzel and Ricky Riccardi, Armstrong biographer and archivist for the Louis Armstrong House Museum, will kick off the 2014 Satchmo Summerfest in New Orleans. At the sold-out opening reception and keynote dinner on July 31, Scott and Ricky will host a keynote discussion on the making of Mosaic’s box set The Columbia and RCA Victor Live Recordings of Louis Armstrong and the All Stars. Check out this article from the New Orleans Times-Picayune about Ricky, Scott and the Mosaic set at Summerfest.

    The Mosaic Armstrong set will be on sale at the Satchmo Summerfest all weekend. Can’t make it to New Orleans? Not to worry: listen to highlights and order your set here.

    Damn, it must be like Amazonia Stadium down in N’Orleans, but I’m sure the Satchmo Festival is well worth the trip!

     
  12. 23:11

    Notes: 2130

    Reblogged from woodendreams

    image: Download

    woodendreams:

Big Buddha, China (by Suchet Suwanmongkol)

Some happiness for you from the Big-B!

    woodendreams:

    Big Buddha, China (by Suchet Suwanmongkol)

    Some happiness for you from the Big-B!